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Hernando County Spotlights Tobacco Use and Lung Health for World No Tobacco Day, May 31, 2019

May 24, 2019

Hernando County is committed to raising awareness around the issue of tobacco use, its negative health effects and the need to quit to improve lung health.

 

Smoking can cause lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer.[i],[ii],[iii] In fact, smoking causes about 80% of all deaths from COPD and is the number one risk factor for lung cancer for both men and women.[iv],[v] Nearly nine out of 10 lung cancers are caused by smoking.[vi]

 

Quitting smoking is a major step to improving your health, including reducing the risk of COPD and lung cancer. At any age, the sooner you quit, the sooner your body can begin to heal.[vii] Two weeks to three months after quitting smoking, your lung function begins to improve.[viii] One to nine months after quitting, coughing and shortness of breath decrease.[ix] Ten years after quitting smoking the risk of dying from lung cancer drops to about half that of a current smoker.[x]

 

Tobacco Free Florida aims to educate Floridians on the various ways to quit and supports them through the process – on World No Tobacco Day and year-round.  If you smoke, or if a loved one smokes, the Florida Department of Health’s Tobacco Free Florida Quit Your Way program offers free and proven-effective resources to help you get started.

 

About Tobacco Free Florida

The Florida Department of Health’s Tobacco Free Florida campaign is a statewide cessation and prevention campaign funded by Florida’s tobacco settlement fund. Since the program began in 2007, more than 212,000 Floridians have successfully quit using one of Tobacco Free Florida's free tools and services. There are now approximately 451,000 fewer adult smokers in Florida than there was 10 years ago, and the state has saved $17.7 billion in health care costs.[1] To learn more about Tobacco Free Florida’s Quit Your Way services, visit www.tobaccofreeflorida.com or follow the campaign on Facebook at www.facebook.com/TobaccoFreeFlorida or on Twitter at www.twitter.com/tobaccofreefla.

 

 

[1]Mann, Nathan M, Nonnemaker, James M., Thompson, Jesse. "Smoking-Attributable Health Care Costs in Florida and Potential Health Care Cost Savings Associated with Reductions in Adult Smoking Prevalence." 2016.

For more information about Quit Your Way, please visit www.tobaccofreeflorida.com/quityourway.

 

[i] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. COPD External[accessed 2019 February 13].

[ii] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014 [accessed 2018 Dec 7].

[iii] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Let’s Make the Next Generation Tobacco-Free: Your Guide to the 50th Anniversary Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014 [accessed 2019 Jan 23].

[iv] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014 

[v] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Let’s Make the Next Generation Tobacco-Free, Your Guide to the 50th Anniversary Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health. https://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/reports/50-years-of-progress/consumer-guide.pdf [Accessed 2018 August 13.]

[vi] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Let’s Make the Next Generation Tobacco-Free, Your Guide to the 50th Anniversary Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health. https://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/reports/50-years-of-progress/consumer-guide.pdf [Accessed 2018 August 13.]

[vii] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. A Report of the Surgeon General: How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: What It Means to You. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2010.

[viii] US Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Benefits of Smoking Cessation: A Report of the Surgeon General. 1990. Accessed at www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/reports/ on September 9, 2016.

[ix] US Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Benefits of Smoking Cessation: A Report of the Surgeon General. 1990. Accessed at www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/reports/ on September 9, 2016.

[x] Jenna Fletcher, Medical News Today. What happens after you quit smoking?. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/317956.php.  Medical News Today. [Accessed 2018 August 3.]